Best of 2017, horror, Movies, Reviews, thriller

Jordan Peele’s Get Out explores the uncanny landscape of racial tension

Coming to UK screens off the back of huge box office success in the US, low budget horror film Get Out is destined to be one of the most talked about films of the year. Review follows… Continue reading

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Best of 2017, biopics, directors, Movies, Reviews

“Dear Lord, help me get just one more” – Hacksaw Ridge and the hellfire of combat

There follows a review of Mel Gibson’s triumphant return to the director’s chair Hacksaw Ridge. If you are looking for a review that will psychoanalyse Gibson you will be disappointed. I am entirely unqualified to go there, and will stick to discussing the actual film. Which is terrific. If you have followed Gibson’s fall from grace (and who hasn’t?) you can see Hacksaw Ridge and draw your own conclusions as to whether it is the work of a man actively seeking redemption or not.  Continue reading

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Movies, Reviews, thriller

Brad Pitt on autopilot ditches romantic thriller Allied into the channel

Opening in the UK on the 25th November, Robert Zemeckis, Brad Pitt, and Marion Cottilard hope to bring some classic Hollywood glamour back to the spy thriller. Do they succeed? Is the headline above a clue? Find out after the jump… Continue reading

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Best of 2016, directors, Movies, Reviews

Creatures of the night – Tom Ford’s Nocturnal Animals

As almost every review has commented, its been seven years since fashionista Tom Ford tried his hand at movies with his debut film 2009’s A Single Man. That movie seemed like a perfect distillation of Ford’s style, a measured, elegant character piece adapted from Christopher Isherwood’s 1964 novel. A Single Man followed a suicidal college professor George Falconer (played by Colin Firth) bereft following the death of his partner Jim over a single day. The film addressed issues of sexuality, and the repression and uncertainty of early sixties American culture. It was not anything if not elegant, meticulous in its period detail and fashions (especially the distinctive glasses worn by Firth). The film met significant acclaim, but there was the suspicion that it was a definitive filmic statement by Ford, a one-off dip in an artistic pool made by a man who could afford to dabble.  Continue reading

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Best of 2016, british film, directors, Movies, Reviews

I, Daniel Blake is a film of devastating emotional impact

You very much know what you are going to get from Ken Loach. He rarely works in genre, unless you consider the Loach picture a genre in itself (the case can be made). Since making Kathy Come Home for the BBC’s Wednesday Play strand in 1966 Loach has spent the ensuing 50 years making socially conscious, usually contemporary dramas with socialist themes. His films take place in working class milieus, and he finds warmth and humour even in the grimmest of subjects. Continue reading

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Genre dreck, horror, Movies, Reviews

If you go down to the woods today, you’re in for no real surprises – Blair Witch review

I’ve only seen 1999’s The Blair Witch Project once, on release in a multiplex in Plymouth with an audience who clearly thought it was rubbish. Normally I’d find this distracting, but despite the evident disdain of my fellow audience members I found the film to be one of the most unpleasant viewing experiences I’d had since seeing Watership Down. I had the last minute of the film in my head for weeks and I wanted it out of there.

In other words, it was a great horror film. Can the new sequel live up to it?

I guess I’ve given that away in the title of this review haven’t I? Still read on please lovely audience. Continue reading

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